I Don’t Like Black Lives Matter. . .

 

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I don’t like black lives matter. I don’t like white lives matter, and even as a police officer, I don’t like blue lives matter. I don’t like all lives matter either. Why? Because, none of it makes any sense, and it’s all divisive. These slogans distract from the real issues at hand.

I was vividly introduced to racial hatred, in my second day of field training as a police officer. I was patrolling an area that was, and still is, statistically high in violent crimes. In this area it is quite normal to work calls with dead bodies laying in the street as their blood washes down towards the gutter. I stopped for lunch with my training officer in a local sandwich shop, and a little boy approached me. I could see the spirit in his eyes that the experiences of living had yet to dampen. He was a child that could not have been more than 5 or so. I dropped down on my knees and began to speak with him. We spoke for about a minute. I still remember his gleaming smile, but then his mother saw what was happening. Her son, a little black boy, was talking to a white police officer, and this enraged her. She swiftly came over, and pulled him away from our conversation. She then said words to him that have stuck in my memory firmly and probably always will. I will not use her exact words in this forum, but it should suffice to say she told him that I hated him because he was black and I was white. She verbally, yet forcefully chastised him for speaking with me. I had a rush of several conflicting emotions at that time. Mind you, I was an experienced 2 day officer. I knew nothing except my sheltered world that so many people live within devoid of the realities of life in difficult areas of town. I felt perplexed, and angry that she would levy such a harsh judgment concerning my morality. I was upset that she was quite literally teaching her young son to hate me because of the color of my skin and my occupation. I was embarrassed because when I looked up, everyone seemed to know that this is just how it works, and I was clueless.

I have thought about that encounter many times since that event. I think of it now as I write these words. I am saddened that there are so many people in this world that still judge others by the color of their skin. In a famous speech delivered by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on August 23rd, 1963, he said these words: “I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.” I have heard this quoted many times, but very few times have I heard the part about “content of character.” Stop, go back and read his words again. He knew that people are to be judged upon their actions, and not on what they cannot nor should not change. In an effort to make my position exceedingly clear. I fervently agree with Dr. King’s statement here, he is completely correct. It is a travesty of epic proportions for a person to judge another person based upon what they look like, and men who propagate this evil should be removed from their position of influence over others if Scriptural morality is to be seeded and take root again within our culture. This isn’t black against white, or white vs. black. This is good vs. evil. There are good white people, and there are evil ones. There are good black people, and there are evil ones. Sin has no color.

We scream for equality as human beings, and ring the bells for what is referred to as social justice with blood on our hands. I say “we” here purposefully and forcefully. I think it’s time that someone starts speaking to and with everyone, instead of just yelling at the other side. There are no sides that matter to God, except His side, and those who oppose Him in thought and subsequent deed. Our Heavenly Father is the great equalizer. We are all equally bound under Him as sinners who have need of repentance before a righteous, just, yet loving God.

The Bible has given us a way out of all of this mess that we have created. It is for each one of us to humble ourselves, look within ourselves, and challenge our thoughts in the backdrop of God’s teachings. We must be intentional here. Let us consider the words of Jesus in Matthew 7:3-5: “Why do you see the speck that is in your brother’s eye, but do not notice the log that is in your own eye? Or how can you say to your brother, ‘Let me take the speck out of your eye, when there is the log in your own eye? You hypocrite, first take the log out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to take the speck out of your brother’s eye.” These are powerful words, that allow us to see clearly, and not be caught up in the rhetoric. They allow us to see inwardly prior to seeing outwardly. Jesus didn’t say a speck/log that was on your shirt, He said a speck/log in your eye. When we do this something supernatural happens. We are humbled, and our anger leaves. We find the solace that only God can provide, and we find it easier to look at Jesus’ words when he commanded us to love our enemies. This is the first step in reconciling differences between people, because it allows us the ability to think and communicate, before lashing out in anger.

We were all created in the Image of God, and we should act like that if we are to serve Him. Every single one of us. I find it is much easier to call someone my brother or sister when we share the same Father.

 


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Matthew 7:5 – “You hypocrite, first take the log out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to take the speck out of your brother’s eye.”

God Bless,

Marc

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